Useful links:

UCAS key dates
UCAS guides and resources
UCAS Guide for Parents (Powerpoint)

Some ‘good to know’ stats

  • 1,028 GCS students applied to university in 2016 (between them they made 4,096 choices).
  • 846 students were accepted to study at university in the UK (this is a 82.3% acceptance rate compared with a 74.6% across the UK).
  • 21.2% of our students went on to study at Swansea University.
  • 172 students won places at Russell Group universities (the top 24 universities in the country)
  • Eight students won a place at Oxbridge.
  • 197 students won places at Sutton Trust 30 universities.
  • The majority of our students went on to study for degrees in Law, Psychology, Nursing, Business & Economics, Social Work, Computer Science, Design & Technology, Engineering and Sport.
  • 63% of our students received a place at their first choice university.
  • 22% of our students went to high tariff universities.
  • 89% of our students were made an offer by universities.

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Choosing a subject and course are two of the most important decisions you’ll make regarding university and it may seem a daunting task. You will need to choose a course which will match your interests, talents and career aspirations.

Things to look out for when choosing a course

•             What grades are needed?
•             Do you need A Level or GCSE grades in certain subjects?
•             How is the course taught?
•             Is it mostly practical or theoretical?
•             What is the course content?
•             How is the course assessed?
•             What is the course structure?
•             What is the university’s policy on students taking a year out?

You should find all of this information on university websites, prospectuses and on the UCAS website. Once you have an idea of what course you would like to do, it’s time to start researching the Universities themselves.

Things to look out for when choosing a university

  • Where is the university?
  • How close do you want to be to home?
  • What kind of place do you want to live (urban or rural etc)?
  • What facilities are available at the university?
  • Is accommodation guaranteed?
  • How highly is the course and university thought of nationwide?
  • Are there any scholarships or bursaries you can apply for?

Once you have a list of universities you have researched and are interested in, it’s time to go to Open Days. These are a great chance to visit the university, get a feel for the place, see the accommodation first-hand, and talk with lecturers and current students.

Writing your Personal Statement

Your Personal Statement is your opportunity to tell the universities why they should choose you. It’s your chance to tell university admissions tutors all about yourself, why you’re applying for their courses, and what makes you a suitable candidate.

University Interviews

Regardless of whatever they’re for, interviews are tough. You need to appear relaxed (when you’re not), make eye contact (without staring), and come through it like a breeze (when all you want to do is get out of there). Many universities want to meet you and ask you questions before they offer you a place on the course. Here are a few things you can do to improve your chances.

Finance and Budgeting

When you go to university, the two main costs you’ll have to meet are your tuition fee and your living costs. The good news is that there is a range of financial support available for you to deal with both.